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Recipe

Liz Earle: how to make your own kombucha

September 7th 2017 / 0 comment

This gut-friendly fermented tea is full of probiotics and makes a cool non-alcoholic alternative to Prosecco. Liz Earle shows you how to make it

Make your own kombucha - fermented black tea

Ingredients

3 green or black tea bags (it must have a base of ‘real’ tea)

80g granulated sugar (don’t panic – the microbes digest this)

900ml boiling water

Kombucha culture (also called a kombucha ‘scoby’ available online)

Equipment

1.5-litre glass jar

1 muslin cloth

Method

Put the tea bags in the glass jar, add the sugar and pour in boiling water almost to the top (make sure your glass jar can tolerate boiling water). Stir, leave it for half an hour, then remove the tea bags.

Now leave it to cool completely, and add your scoby plus any liquid that the scoby comes with. Cover the glass jar with the muslin secured with string and leave it in a spot that’s away from direct sunlight and has a steady temperature.

Leave the kombucha to ferment; it will take anything between 5 and 18 days. The colour will change slightly and it will become cloudier. Taste, using a small glass – it should taste fruity and tart and maybe a little ‘fizzy’. This means it’s ready. The longer you leave it, the less sweet it will become and it will begin to taste sour. It depends on how you like it.

MORE GLOSS: all you need to know about kombucha and its health benefits

Pour the kombucha through a nylon sieve into a large glass or jug – this is for drinking – leaving behind about a quarter in the jar with the scoby. This is what you will use to make your next brew.

To flavour the final juice, add freshly squeezed ginger, raspberries, oranges, lemon or lime, or add to your favourite smoothies or vegetable juice.

For more gut-friendly recipes by Liz see The Good Gut Guide by Liz Earle and lizearlewellbeing.com

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