Nutrition

Do you have post-summer body panic?

August 27th 2017 / Susannah Taylor / 0 comment

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Had a great summer but feeling a tad unhealthy right now? Nutritionist James Collins says the key to finding your healthy feet again is to start a ‘transition period’ (aka ‘time to reign it in’). Susannah Taylor gets on board  

The tan is fading (it did in a week, if you’re honest) as are the memories of watching the sun set over the Aegean. Now it’s nearly September and all you are left with are an extra 7lbs and jeans that fitted you perfectly back in June, are now straining at the seams. Back at your desk, you are now questioning those daily Magnums, all that rosé and lolling about on sun loungers where the only exercise you did was walking to the bar to order another Aperol.

You are not alone. Leading Sports and Exercise Nutritionist James Collins says he has many clients that visit him at this time of year at his practice (The Centre for Health and Human Performance on London’s Harley Street) for just that reason. “They are panicking that they’ve totally fallen off the healthy bandwagon and are not sure how to get back on it,” he says.

Firstly, Collins, who advised Team GB Olympic athletes in the run up to Rio 2016, stresses the importance of not beating yourself up about it - we all deserve a break. A specialist in elite sports and exercise nutrition he says he treats his clients as he would his athletes, “We say to athletes, 'Eat, drink and be merry and get loads of rest on holiday.' We actually actively tell them not to keep exercising and eating as they have been - we all need mental and physical recovery.”

But then how do you break the habits of a wholly unhealthy (but thoroughly good fun) summer? Here is Collins’ advice that should leave you feeling a bit more in control of your body and mind as September starts.

Start with a ‘transition week’

Like, possibly, right after the bank holiday. Collins says in order to find your healthy feet again it’s important to start a transition phase. “This is a week or a short period of time where you start to reign it all in again and start the process to a healthier you.” This way, Collins explains, you aren’t suddenly throwing yourself hell-for-leather into a new health and fitness regime which could be a real shock on both your body and mind and undo the relaxing effects of your summer break.

Reintroduce a (gentle) exercise programme

Collins recommends to his athletes to start an exercise programme of some sort. He's not talking five days a week or signing up for Barry’s Hell Week (that's one Barry’s Bootcamp for seven days in a row), but rather a couple of easier workouts for a week or two, whether that’s running, an exercise class or yoga/strength exercises. The aim is to switch your body back on, he says, not to put yourself off for life.

MORE GLOSS: How to become a morning (exercise) person

Step away from the snacks

I can vouch for this as a cure for suddenly tighter-than-normal jeans. I remember once having a consultation with nutritional therapist Amelia Freer and she told me to cut out snacks between meals. While I didn’t really think I ate many snacks, when I shone a spotlight on it, it turned out I did. There were bits of dark chocolate all throughout the day, munching on fruit/ cheese/ scoops of peanut butter mid-afternoon and general grazing on kids' leftovers. Just a week of being a bit stricter with myself, meant that I could feel my jeans start to loosen again.

“All you need to do is be a bit tighter with your regime and create a slight calorie deficit and you can make significant progress,” says Collins. This means out with the Calippos, chocolate with a cup of tea and to eat three good meals a day. No cordials and sweet drinks (including fruit juices) either says Collins. It’s tough and you might feel a bit hungry, but it works.

Rein in the alcohol consumption

A few glasses of vino or cocktails every night may be the norm on holiday and it can be a hard habit to break once home. “You don’t need to go cold turkey” says Collins, “But if you’ve been having alcohol most nights of the week try going a few nights without. You will feel way more in control in body and mind.” Not only will alcohol make you sluggish in the morning and less likely to want to work out but the high sugar content in many alcoholic drinks will end up on your waistline.

Start listening to your body again – and don’t be afraid to feel hungry

You may have ignored your body for the last few months, but Collins advises it’s time to start getting in tune with it once more. By this, he means being afraid of feeling a little hungry. We are very accustomed to eating when we feel our stomach beginning to growl, but not feeling full all day is really not a bad thing. “Embracing a bit of hunger is really OK,” he says.

In fact, I have a friend who recently lost five stone (yes five) and she did it by cutting out all sugar, refined carbs and snacks between meals. She said if she was hungry "so be it" - she knew she'd eat in an hour or so.

MORE GLOSS: 10 ways to kick your sugar cravings

Don’t work up an energy deficit

Finally, Collins advises not taking things to the extreme by cutting everything out of your diet and going hard in daily HIIT classes. “I’ve been discussing ‘Energy Deficiency’ a lot recently,” says Collins (Collins is president of the Royal Society of Medicine’s Food and Health Forum). “Many people are going to extremes and not eating enough then exercising too hard, leaving their energy levels on the floor.” This not only makes you feel atrocious, but it means you can’t do a proper workout (therefore you won’t get the results you need) plus you are more likely to hate every minute and give up everything by September 15th.Just because you had a great summer, doesn’t mean you have to have an awful September," says Collins. The key is to be kind to yourself.

Contact James Collins at jamescollinsnutrition.com Follow Susannah Taylor on Instagram here

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